The hobbyist candle maker has a variety of waxes to choose from. Not all wax is alike. Here is a look at the different types of candle wax, their uses and melting points.

Bayberry Wax

This is an expensive type of wax since it takes 15 pounds of bayberries to make just one pound of wax. It has a pleasing scent. It works best in tapers. Its melting point is 118 degrees Fahrenheit.

Beeswax

This is another expensive type of candle wax for sale since it’s made in beehives and not in factories. It is usually sold in soft gold colors and has a noticeable honey scent. It gives off very little smoke in comparison to other types of wax. Since this is an animal product, vegans need to avoid beeswax. It melts at 150 degrees Fahrenheit.

Microcrystalline Wax

Also called amorphous candle wax, microcrystalline wax is made from petroleum. It comes in two types – hard and soft. Hard microcrystalline wax melts at 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Soft microcrystalline wax melts at 150 to 170 degrees Fahrenheit. They are sold as pellets and in blends with paraffin wax. They help give extra strength to paraffin wax candles.

Paraffin Wax

Sold in pellets or blocks, this is the most common candle wax available to the hobbyist. It is made from crude oil. There are three different types of paraffin wax based on their melting points. Low melting point paraffin wax melts at 126 to 132 degrees Fahrenheit. Medium melting point paraffin wax melts at 135 to 145 degrees Fahrenheit. This type is best for poured candles. High melting point paraffin wax melts at 145 to 150 degrees Fahrenheit. This type is best for hurricane lamps.

Soy Wax

This candle wax is made from soybean oil. It’s a good alternative for beeswax. Depending on the oil blend used in making a particular batch of soy wax, the melting points differ from 120 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Unlike paraffin wax, soy wax rarely forms air bubbles. Soy wax is the best choice for making scented candles, as it holds scent better than other forms of wax.

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